8 Digital Marketing Acronyms Hoteliers Should Understand



If you’re anything like me, you may occasionally find yourself Googling acronyms you overhear colleagues, clients, friends, or even your little nephew say in order to decode their seemingly cryptic code. In the fast paced digital world we’re all living in, shortened phrases can save us timeā€¦ when we know what they mean. Unfortunately, we don’t always know what they mean and oftentimes they vary across industries and professions. In the hotel marketing world, it’s not uncommon to overhear some conversation along the lines of: “Will you log out of the CMS then check the CTRs of our latest PPC campaign and update the KPI report by EOD? Please, and thanks!” You stand there for a second, puzzled. She wants her to do what?!

In this post, we’ll uncover the mystery behind some of the most commonly used digital marketing acronyms to help hoteliers make sense of our hotel online marketing jargon.

Website Terms

CMS: Content Management System
Hotel Marketer Context: “Can you provide us with the login to your hotel website’s CMS?”

Content Management Systems are web-based tools that allow you, as a website administrator, to easily update your site’s content without needing to be intimately familiar with HTML coding. A CMS helps you arrange how your website will look, determine what it will say, and point to where your links will lead. The beauty of a CMS is that it takes care of much of the “behind the scenes” work that non-technical website admins might otherwise spend hours attempting to figure out. At Blue Magnet Interactive, we build our clients’ websites on open source CMSs like Joomla or WordPress, which provide user-friendly interfaces and allow clients to have more control over their hotel’s website in the long run.

UX: User Experience
Hotel Marketer Context: “We’re designing your hotel’s new standalone site to have a cleaner layout and overall improved UX.”

Remember the last time you visited a website that took so long to load that you gave up on your search? Or when you landed on a homepage that was so cluttered with text and flashing images that your eyes didn’t know where to look first? Or, my favorite, when the website’s text is in such a searingly bright color that you can barely make out the words on the page? These are all examples of poor user experience. Since websites are meant to be marketing tools that help generate sales, your hotel’s website should be designed in the most user friendly way possible.

Wondering what makes a website user friendly? In two simple words: site architecture. A site with a good UX usually has a fast page load time, logical link structure, clean layout, and no 404 errors. To put it bluntly, if your guests aren’t thinking about how impossible it is to book a room on your website, your site is probably providing a good user experience!

Advertising Terms

CTR: Click-Through Rate
Hotel Marketer Context: “Your hotel’s latest e-newsletter had a 14% CTR when we featured the holiday package. That’s the highest rate we’ve seen so far!”

ctr_meme

In layman’s terms: CTR = total people who clicked your content / total people who saw your content

In advertising terms: CTR = total clicks / total reach

Example: 750 people clicked your Facebook ad / 25,000 people saw your Facebook ad = 3% CTR

Click-through rates ultimately indicate how compelling your content is. Was it compelling enough to get a visitor to click the button, link, or ad? As a hotelier, you may have heard your marketing specialist refer to CTR when reviewing your hotel’s email marketing campaign (what was the CTR of the link to your website?), assessing your hotel’s Expedia TravelAd reports (what was the CTR of shoppers actually clicking the ad they were exposed to?), or when reporting how well your hotel’s Facebook ad performed (what was the CTR of Facebook users who saw the ad and actually clicked the link to “like” your page?). The more relevant and interesting your content is to your audience, the higher the click-through rate will be.

Strategic marketers have gotten very creative with ways to increase their campaigns’ CTRs. In reference to website links, one of the smartest marketers I know once said, “Where there’s traffic, there’s hope.” The higher the CTR, the more website traffic, the better and the chances you’ll sell your hotel rooms! See where I’m going with this?

PPC: Pay Per Click
Hotel Marketer Context: “If April is a high need period for your hotel, we can set up a PPC campaign targeting mobile searches to bring in more website traffic.”

Pay Per Click is an advertising model that we talk about mainly when referring to online ads. These types of ads show up as “sponsored” results on search engine result pages. We use PPC advertising to capture the attention of customers who would likely otherwise click on the first organic search result they see. The beauty of PPC is that advertisers only pay for desired actions taken by their audience rather than paying for an advertisement’s total exposure.

*BONUS acronym* “CPC” stands for “cost per click” and is an advertising metric often referenced in conjunction with PPC campaigns. For example, while running a PPC ad campaign, you may find that your average CPC is $0.35. In other words, you are paying $0.35 each time someone clicks your ad. PPC advertisements should be highly targeted using keywords and demographic metrics.

Search Engines Terms

SEM: Search Engine Marketing
Hotel Marketer Context: “This month we’re focusing on our SEM efforts by identifying more link building opportunities for your property.”

Here’s a topic all of us at BMI could go on and on (and on and on) about, but instead, I’ll kindly give you the short summary. Search Engine Marketing refers to a whole slew of online tactics we use to improve a website’s overall ranking in search results. Specifically with hotel marketing, our SEM efforts combine search engine optimization (and all that SEO entails), local listings, social media, link building, and PPC advertising (aren’t you glad you already understand that acronym?!).

SERP: Search Engine Results Page
Hotel Marketer Context: “After updating the meta content for your hotel’s website, the site is now ranking 3 positions higher on Google’s SERP!”

(Pronounced like “Slurp” but without the “L”. Try it. It’s kind of fun to say.) I’m willing to bet that you already know more about SERPs than you think. Any time you enter a search term or phrase into Google, Bing, Yahoo, or any other search engine, the information and links to related websites that the search engine returns on your screen make up SERPs. Some of the key components you’ll see on SERPs include organic search results, sponsored search results, social search results, rich snippets of information that Google thinks you’ll be interested in, and Google’s “carousel” of location based results.

Local Search Terms

NAP: Name, Address, Phone
Hotel Marketer Context: “We’re auditing all of your hotel’s local listings to make sure your hotel’s NAP is consistent throughout the internet.”

NAP (also sometimes called NAP-W or NAP-U [“W” stands for “Website”, or “U” for “URL”]) refers to your hotel’s online identity. In the messy, unpredictable world of local listings, the more consistently your hotel’s NAP appears across listings, the more trusted your hotel will be in the eyes of search engines (and guests). So, for example, you don’t want use your hotel’s 1-800 number in one listing while using its local number in another. Also, be careful not to abbreviate addresses in some listings (St. vs. Street) while fully spelling them out in others. While Google is pretty darn smart, it can be easily confused by conflicting NAPs. Bottom line: to ensure your hotel avoids an identity crisis and establishes authority in search results, NAP consistency is key!

Social Media Terms

RT: Re-tweet
Hotel Marketer Context: “Last month your hotel’s Twitter account had 15 RTs which led to an overall increase in website referral traffic from Twitter.”

Re-tweets are one of the most important Twitter metrics for measuring successful patterns of audience engagement. RTs are essentially social re-shares of your message to a new audience that was otherwise out of your reach. For example, let’s say your hotel wants to drive room sales so you tweet a special discount code. Your followers will see your discount code, and, if the deal is juicy enough, one of your followers may RT your message to his network of followers. This ripple effect will allow your message to be seen by not only your followers, but also by the followers of anyone who RT-ed your message. The more RTs your tweets get, the wider the reach and exposure your message will receive. Ensure your tweets are informative, compelling, or humorous to increase your chances of getting a RT.

AWDLY: Are We Done Learning Yet?

There are hundreds of other digital marketing related acronyms out there, but by understanding some of these more commonly used terms, you’ll be able to better understand your hotel marketer’s reports and recommendations.

If you’re ever unsure of what a digital marketing acronym stands for, tweet us at @blue_magnet and we’ll do our best to explain it to you in 140 characters or less!